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Here's what fish you should or shouldn't eat from the San Luis Reservoir and forebay

Low clouds and fog shroud parts of San Luis Reservoir as seen near Dinosaur Point on Tuesday, Jan. 24, 2017.
Low clouds and fog shroud parts of San Luis Reservoir as seen near Dinosaur Point on Tuesday, Jan. 24, 2017. ckohlruss@fresnobee.com

The California Environmental Protection Agency has made recommendations on which fish to eat and which to avoid from the San Luis Reservoir and O'Neill Forebay, based on health risks from mercury levels and other chemicals.

Women between the ages 18 and 45 years, and children under 18 are recommended to eat two servings of Tule Perch and one serving of American Shad from the San Luis Reservoir per week, according to an EPA news release. But they should avoid black bass species, Common Carp and Striped Bass.

One serving is an eight ounce fish fillet, measured before cooking, according to the EPA.

Woman ages 18 to 45 and children under 18 also can eat six total servings of Inland Silverside or one serving of black bass, catfish or Striped Bass from the O'Neill Forebay per week.

All others are recommended to eat a total of five servings ot Tule Perch per week, two servings of American Shad per week or one serving of black bass, Common Carp or Striped Bass per week from the San Luis Reservoir.

Also, they can eat seven servings per week of Inland Silverside or two servings of black bass, catfish or Striped Bass from the O'Neill Forebay per week.

Recommendation for other fish in the reservoir and forebay can be found at the Office of Environmental Health Hazard Assessment website, at https://oehha.ca.gov.

Eating slightly more than the recommended amount of fish occasionally won't likely cause health problems, the release states.

The recommendations are based on levels of mercury and polychlorinated bephenyls, or PCBs, in the fish. 

Mercury is a natural metal that is released from mining and coal burning, the release states. Mercury is linked to damage in the brain and nervous systems in developing children and fetuses.

PCBs are industrial chemicals that were banned in the late 1970s, but are still around in the environment. The chemicals are found in fish fat, skin and internal organs, which is why the EPA recommends eating the skinless meat portion of the fish.

The release states that the EPA recommendation is separate from a June warning by the state Department of Water Resources, which urges boaters and recreational users to avoid contact with the water and shellfish in the San Luis Reservoir due to a toxic blue-green algae bloom.

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